Category: Program Development

Medical Humanities - Initiating the Journey at Xavier University School of Medicine

Dr P. Ravi Shankar has been facilitating medical humanities sessions for over eight years, first in Nepal and currently in Aruba in the Dutch Caribbean. He has a keen interest in and has written extensively on the subject. He has previously written several pieces for the Literature, Arts, and Medicine blog. I have always enjoyed facilitating medical humanities sessions right from the time I facilitated my first voluntary module for interested students at the Manipal College of Medical Sciences, Pokhara, [read more]

Saying Goodbye

EDITOR’S NOTE: Since this post first appeared we have resumed updating the blog. After more than three years of blog postings, we are no longer adding posts. Our original aim was to bring many medical humanities voices, perspectives, and projects to the attention of those who are working in the field. To that end we published 78 invited entries by almost as many different authors. Our posts always began with an image, in keeping with our belief that art is [read more]

Interdisciplinary Arts Project in a Family Medicine Residency Training Program

…through the courses I took in the Department of Education I discovered academic researchers were exploring different theories of knowledge and research (Barone and Eisner, Clandinin and Connelly, Cole and Knowles, and Patton)): i.e. Qualitative Inquiry, Interdisciplinary Artistic Inquiry, and Reflexive Inquiry

Walk a Mile in My Moccasins

Commentary by Amy Ellwood, MSW, LCSW; Professor of Family Medicine & Psychiatry, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Las Vegas, Nevada Communicating Through Story Storytelling has been around since the dawn of time. Before the invention of paper, the Gutenberg press, telephone, television, internet, Kindle, texting, tweeting, Skyping, and emailing, people communicated by actually talking to each other face to face. Before language evolved, animal species communicated through grunts, howls, screeches, and gestures. Body language and micro expressions say more [read more]

Physicians' Storytelling via Webinar

The AMSA National Book Discussion Webinars offer a unique online experience between physician-authors and medical students to encourage reading beyond the medical school curriculum, both for professional development and for personal enrichment.

The "Parallel 'Parallel Chart'"

Commentary by Hedy S. Wald, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Family Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI May, 2006. We treated our Doctoring small group to a nice home-cooked meal to celebrate the conclusion of their first year of medical school-eight students, two lucky teachers. Students, after all, are hungry for knowledge but they’re also hungry. We had grown to know these now 25% doctors through didactic but more so through their reflective narratives that we [read more]

Fostering Interdisciplinary Community: A Humanities Perspective

many of us in the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities believe that it is only through a meeting of the minds between biomedicine and other fields such as literature, art, philosophy and history that we can understand the experiences of patients and providers of care (roles that almost all of us will inhabit at some point in our lives).

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